Efficacy of elvie trainer – Secondary Research

There is a wealth of existing literature that supports the effectiveness of Elvie Trainer, as a biofeedback device to enhance technique, compliance and outcomes with pelvic floor muscle training.

The prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunction is well evidenced:

• 37% of women have at least one type of pelvic floor dysfunction[1]
• Up to 70% of women experience symptoms during pregnancy[2]
• 68.5% of pregnant women suffer from lower back pain[3], which pelvic floor muscle training can help alleviate[4]
• Some degree of prolapse is seen in 50% of parous women[5]
• There’s an 11% lifetime surgery risk[6]

The effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training for treating and preventing pelvic floor dysfunction is also well evidenced:
• Pelvic floor muscle training is effective in treating stress, urgency or mixed urinary incontinence; pelvic organ prolapse; and lower bowel dysfunction[7]
• Pelvic floor muscle training improves symptoms in up to 70% of cases of stress urinary incontinence[8]
• Women with stress urinary incontinence are up to 17 times more likely to report a cure if they undergo pelvic floor muscle training[9]
• Continent pregnant women who undergo pelvic floor muscle training during pregnancy are less likely to report urinary incontinence up to 12 months after delivery[10]

The need for biofeedback to support pelvic floor muscle training is also well evidenced:
• 64% of patients adhere to pelvic floor muscle training and health advice short term but only 23% long term[11]
• Exercise adherence has been identified as an important predictor of overall pelvic floor muscle training effectiveness and cost effectiveness is dependent upon whether short-term outcomes can be maintained long term[12]
• 30% of women cannot perform a healthy pelvic floor contraction with only written or verbal instruction[13]
The effectiveness of biofeedback to support pelvic floor muscle training is also well evidenced:
• Comparing pelvic floor muscle training with biofeedback to pelvic floor muscle training alone, patients using biofeedback see better improvement and a better long-term effect on motivation[14]
• Over one year, adding a biofeedback device to pelvic floor muscle training increases success rates by 10%[15]

1. Lawrence, J. M., Lukacz, E. S., Nager, C. W., Hsu, J.-W. Y., & Luber, K. M. (2008). Prevalence and co-occurrence of pelvic floor disorders in community-dwelling women. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 111(3).
2. Price, N., Dawood R., Jackson S. R. (2010). Maturitas, Pelvic floor exercise for urinary incontinence: A systematic literature review. Maturitas, 67(4), 309-15.
3. Wang, Shu-Ming MD; Dezinno, Peggy RN, BSN; Maranets, Inna MD; Berman, Michael R. MD; Caldwell-Andrews, Alison A. PhD; Kain, Zeev N. MD (2004) ‘Low Back Pain During Pregnancy: Prevalence, Risk Factors, and Outcomes’, Obstetrics & Gynecology, Vol. 104, No. 1, pp 65-70.
4. Kluge, J., Hall, D., Louw, Q., Theron, G., Grové, D. (2011) ‘Specific exercises to treat pregnancy-related low back pain in a South African population’, Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, Vol. 113, No. 3, pp. 187-191.
5. Hagen, S., & Stark, D. (2011). Conservative prevention and management of pelvic organ prolapse in women. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (12). http://doi.org/10.1002/14651858.CD003882.pub4
6. Olsen, A. L., Smith, V. J., Bergstrom, J. O., Colling, J. C., & Clark, A. L. (1997). Epidemiology of surgically managed pelvic organ prolapse and urinary incontinence. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 89(4), 501–506. http://doi.org/10.1016/S0029-7844(97)00058-6
7. Dumoulin, C., Hay-Smith, J., Frawley, H., McClurg, D., Alewijnse, D., Bo, K., … Van Kampen, M. (2015). 2014 consensus statement on improving pelvic floor muscle training adherence: International Continence Society 2011 State-of-the-Science Seminar. Neurourology and Urodynamics, 34(7), 600–605. http://doi.org/10.1002/nau.22796
8. Price N, et al. Pelvic floor exercise for urinary incontinence: A systematic literature review. Maturitas (2010), doi:10.1016/j.maturitas.2010.08.004
9. Bø, K., Talseth, T. and Holme, I. (1999) ‘Single blind, Randomized Controlled Trial of Pelvic Floor Exercises, Electrical Stimulation, Vaginal Cones, and no Treatment in Management of Genuine Stress Incontinence in Women.’ BMJ, Vol. 20, No. 318, pp. 487-93.
10. Hay-Smith, J., Mørkved, S., Fairbrother, K. A., & Herbison, G. P. (2008). Pelvic floor muscle training for prevention and treatment of urinary and faecal incontinence in antenatal and postnatal women. Cochrane Database Syst Rev, 4, CD.
11. Dumoulin, C., Hay-Smith, J., Frawley, H., McClurg, D., Alewijnse, D., Bo, K., … Van Kampen, M. (2015). 2014 consensus statement on improving pelvic floor muscle training adherence: International Continence Society 2011 State-of-the-Science Seminar. Neurourology and Urodynamics, 34(7), 600–605. http://doi.org/10.1002/nau.22796
12. Dumoulin, C., Hay-Smith, J., Frawley, H., McClurg, D., Alewijnse, D., Bo, K., … Van Kampen, M. (2015). 2014 consensus statement on improving pelvic floor muscle training adherence: International Continence Society 2011 State-of-the-Science Seminar. Neurourology and Urodynamics, 34(7), 600–605. http://doi.org/10.1002/nau.22796
13. Bø, K. (2004). Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport. SportsMedicine, 34(7), 451–464.
14. Glavind, K., Nøhr, S. B., & Walter, S. (1996). Biofeedback and physiotherapy versus physiotherapy alone in the treatment of genuine stress urinary incontinence. International Urogynecology Journal, 7(6), 339–343. http://doi.org/10.1007/BF01901111
15. Imamura et al. (2010) Systematic review and economic modelling of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of non-surgical treatments for women with stress urinary incontinence. Health Technology Assessment 2010; Vol. 14: No. 40 Bø, K. (2004). Urinary incontinence, pelvic floor dysfunction, exercise and sport. SportsMedicine, 34(7), 451–464.

Posted on: June 14, 2018